RedCan Graffiti Jam

Cheyenne River Youth Project 8th Annual RedCan Invitational Graffiti Jam 2022

Join us for this FREE event!

July 6-7, 2022

Mural painting and youth art activities at sites throughout the Eagle Butte community

July 8-9, 2022

Painting, performances, community meals and youth art activities

CRYP’s Waniyetu Wowapi Art Park
702 4th Street, Eagle Butte, SD 57625

Boy from community painting with spray can with other youth and adults also painting in the background
Held in the heart of the Cheyenne River Lakota Nation, RedCan is the first and only graffiti jam in Indian Country.

For four life-changing days every summer, this award-winning event offers an unprecedented opportunity for the Cheyenne River community to experience humankind’s largest art movement while also strengthening connections with traditional Lakota culture. Along the way, RedCan provides meaningful, lasting inspiration for our young people, who are discovering the profound power of art in finding their own voices, exploring their identities, and expressing themselves.

Graffiti jams are dedicated to introducing graffiti as an art form, bringing together people who exemplify the contemporary graffiti art movement and how it has evolved since its inception more than a half century ago.

Since its 2015 inception, RedCan has been breaking new ground. Not only are our featured artists showcasing a global movement, its relevance, and how to be part of it, they’re connecting the graffiti world with the indigenous one.

Boy from community painting with spray can with other youth and adults also painting in the background
Boy from community painting with spray can with other youth and adults also painting in the background
Graffiti jams are dedicated to introducing graffiti as an art form, bringing together people who exemplify the contemporary graffiti art movement and how it has evolved since its inception more than a half century ago.

Since its 2015 inception, RedCan has been breaking new ground. Not only are our featured artists showcasing a global movement, its relevance, and how to be part of it, they’re connecting the graffiti world with the indigenous one.

Together, we are sharing and revitalizing our stories, our language, our values, and our identities. And through reclaiming our spaces in this way, we are lifting up our community.

Support RedCan

Hosting such a major event with acclaimed artists from across the country is no small task, and RedCan wouldn’t be possible without you. You can make a contribution to support this year’s graffiti jam through Square or PayPal. All proceeds will be used to purchase art supplies, food, and beverages and to help cover the artists’ travel expenses.

For more information: redcan.cryp@gmail.com
For news updates: Subscribe to our email list

Learn more about our new Waniyetu Wowapi (Winter Count) Institute and Art Park Project and how you can help!

Redcan 2022 Artists

179

179 is a muralist and teaching artist in Seattle, and works with the community on public art projects and workshops. Her goal is to create safe and beautiful spaces for community members by engaging them in mindful installations. She loves working with youth and challenging their brilliant minds to think about their roles within the rapid growth of our city. Her work strives to engage the viewer to be a part of their environment through observation, critique, and participation. She believes community engagement is vital to successful art planning, and art should be accessible to all. Her focus is education and leading by example.

LUCIOUS
Lucious/Lucid is an enrolled tribal member of Marten Falls Anishinaabe First Nation and has paternal ties to Constance Lake Oji-Cree First Nation. She is an active graffiti artist and muralist. She is a project coordinator for an all BIPOC artist collective called City Mischief Murals. She utilizes art to elevate community voice, healing, and advance change. She has been part of several community arts-based events and mural projects throughout the United States, Canada, Africa, and Mexico. She uses acrylic paint, aerosol paint, traditional Native American artforms and dance as a personal and political tool to address, explore and portray contemporary indigenous struggle.
REZMO
Natasha Martinez is Diné and Mexicá, and she grew up on the Navajo Nation Reservation in New Mexico. She has been doing graffiti for 18 years across the Southwest, and she enjoys teaching graffiti workshops in Native communities. As a graffiti writer, she is best known as Rezmo, which is short for Rezfunkmomma. “My work represents who I am and the women that inspire me, near and far,” she says. “I grew up with dual heritage, and often people judged me by the color of my skin and the way that I look, thinking I didn’t know anything about my cultures and traditions. In fact, I grew up in a very traditional Diné household. I found my voice and the acceptance of myself through my art, and through graffiti. My work has connected me to others who have felt the same way about themselves at one time or another. Art, to me, is a powerful way to communicate, and sometimes it’s the best way to show how I’m feeling.” Rezmo currently lives in the Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian Community in Arizona.
TAMIJOY
Tammy Joy Granados is an enrolled member of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, from the Itazipco and Hunkpapa bands of the Lakota/Dakota people, and she was born and raised in Eagle Butte, South Dakota. She currently resides in the community of LaPlant on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation. She uses the name Tammy Joy Art for her professional work, and TamiJoy for her graffiti and street art.

Tammy’s expressionistic style is honed through years of experimenting with different mediums and styles — primarily acrylic paint, graffiti and street art, graphic art, and paper. She draws inspiration from cultural components and storytelling, as well as from subjects and objects that have great meaning to her.

Tammy has four young children who inspire her daily, and they often can be found in the pieces she creates. She credits her artistic knowledge to her late uncle, Leonard Granados; her pride in her uncle’s creations evolved into a motivation to learn and find an avenue for her own self-expression. She also attributes a great deal of her artistic growth to her years employed with the Cheyenne River Youth Project in Eagle Butte; she learned a variety of artistic techniques and mediums alongside the young people she served.

Tammy sees her artistic development as a lifelong journey, one in which she is constantly fine-tuning her artistic vision and enhancing her skills and techniques. While she works primarily with acrylic on canvas, she also creates large-scale murals as a graffiti and street artist. On a smaller scale, she produces craft items and wood decor. She enjoys video creation as well as graphic arts; she creates logos, publicity pieces, holiday cards, T-shirt designs, and illustrations for children’s books and other publications. For several years, Tammy has participated as an accepted artist in the “Native POP: People of the Plains” art market, and she has consistently placed in CRST’s Labor Day Domestic and Lakota Arts Exhibit. In addition, her work has been displayed at the Journey Museum in Rapid City as well as at the Rapid City Public Library.

YUKUE
An enrolled member of the Pascua Yaqui Tribe from Guadalupe, Arizona, Anitra Molina was raised on the New Pascua Reservation in Tucson. Her artist name, Yukue, refers to the rain that falls during the Arizona summer monsoons. She is a graffiti writer and a self-taught painter and aerosol mural artist. In her artwork,

Anitra incorporates applied graffiti paint techniques, bright color palette, and surreal pop — with elements of neo-folk art with an emphasis on expressing indigenous joy, attitude, and empowerment t through sun-kissed cactus characters named “Nopalitas,” “Saugo,” and “Taawe ToothTaker.” Her work also reflects a deep admiration for and spiritual connection to the lands and sky of the Sonoran Desert as well as Yaqui Tribal cultural essences and symbolism. Mixed into her paints, viewers will discover a dreamy and joyous kawaii twist with attitudes of punk rock and heavy metal.

EAST

A native of Illiana (Illinois-Indiana) now residing in Denver, East graduated from the Chicago Academy of Fine & Performing Arts in 1988. This classically trained scholarship recipient and teacher’s apprentice excelled in the arts of Intaglio printmaking and color theory. His love of technical lines and color spilled over into his passion for urban art, and East became a leading influence in the Illinois underground art scene and is a founder of Midwest graffiti styles. With more than 30 years’ experience, East continues to surge forward — through his consistency and perseverance, he has earned the title “Midwest Master.” East is the lead instructor for CRYP’s Waniyetu Wowapi Lakota Youth Arts & Culture Institute, and he continues to pursue his passion for letters and lettering styles.

CYFI

Rock Cyfi Martinez is a native to Tucson, Arizona. He is now lives and creates in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Pulling from elements of his surroundings in nature and life, Martinez uses these themes throughout his work. He is influenced by his Mexican American heritage and native descent. A self-taught artist born in 1980 with more than 18 years of experience as a freelance muralist, Martinez has produced more than 300 murals throughout his career.

www.cyfiart.com

HOKA

Hoka Skenandore was born in 1982 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. His multicultural roots include the Oneida of Wisconsin, the Oglala Lakota and the La Jolla Band of Luiseño, as well as Chicano heritage. He grew up in a home where he learned to appreciate traditional native art as well as fine art. On his own, he embraced the DIY ethos of punk rock, hip-hop culture and painted graffiti art. He transitioned from painting graffiti to working on murals in the Albuquerque metro area. After a year in AmeriCorps, he attended the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 2006. He is currently pursuing a Master of Fine Arts degree at the University of Oklahoma. He also has written for First American Art Magazine and Contemporary Native Art Magazine, and he recently contributed his perspectives on the intersection of graffiti, street art and indigenous culture to a chapter written by Matthew Ryan Smith, titled “Indigenous Graffiti and Street Art as Resistance.”

BIAFRA

Biafra Inc. (pronounced bahy-ah-fruh or bee-ah-fruh) is an artist residing in the Twin Cities. He took his name in part from Jello Biafra from the band Dead Kennedys, the first band he got into that had content in their lyrics. His work is a visual retelling of stories that are apart of his life; much of it takes a critical look at “white” culture. Biafra is a multifaceted artist who uses a variety of mediums, including spray paint, screen printing, stencils, stickers and posters. As his work spreads across North America, he continues to work tirelessly to get his imagery out to the public.

“My work is a reflection of the culture around me. I retell stories that I have experienced or been told through my illustrations and large-scale murals.”

www.biafrainc.com

WUNDR

Wundr is populating the space we live in with his playful, mischievous and always evolving illustrations. The characters he creates are not meant to represent any specific individual, but are stitched together from pieces of all of us. Wundr is currently producing artwork in multiple mediums, including murals, illustration, toys and fine art. Influenced by traditional graffiti, cartoons and comics, Wundr’s work provides a fresh take on designing characters that are constantly creeping into our known habitat.

www.wundr.org

LAWST

Lawst uses his Potawatomi, Menominee and Puerto Rican heritage to influence and shape his visual artwork. His murals and photography examine social and political issues such as the criminalization of immigrants and indigenous populations, urban life, and self- identity. He has been a part of many collaborative mural events across the country, is a member of City Mischief Murals, and is the Founder of Intertribal Styles BIPOC Graffiti Jam.

TSEL
I was born in Mexico in 1972, but I was raised in the Northside Uptown community in Chicago. Arriving in 1976, I attended Chicago Public Schools and graduated from Nicolas Senn High School in 1991.

I went on to attend the American Academy of Art in 1992-93, and the University of Illinois at Chicago in 1995, where I took general courses in liberal arts and sciences. I hold a Bachelor of Arts degree from Columbia College with computer, technical and animation skills. At Columbia, I also was able to gain skills in screenwriting and developing other multimedia disciplines.

I have experience teaching art in classrooms, which I’ve utilized at Roosevelt High School, New Trier High School, and Evanston Township High School, to name a few.

My expertise is in street art and Aztec cultural imagery and mural paintings. It has been featured in the Chicago Sun-Times, Redeye, La Raza, and other print publications; it also has been featured on WGN News, Fox News, CNN, NBC, ABC News, and LatiNation. My mixed-media designs and creations have been displayed in Chicago galleries, on Michigan Avenue (three times), and in the National Museum of Mexican Art.

I live in Chicago with my family.

RedCan 2022 Daily Opening and Closing Prayers By

WAKINYAN MAZA
Wakinyan Maza is a local drumming group.

Redcan 2022 Special Guests

LET IT BEE
An indigenous lyricist from Eagle Butte, South Dakota, in the heart of the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation.
THE SAMPSON BROTHERS
As world-renowned dancers, Lumhe and Samsoche Sampson (Mvskoke Creek/Seneca)—a.k.a. the Sampson Brothers— strive to promote cultural pride, unity, and hope by setting a positive example through art, education, and dance. They hope to give back to their tribe and the Indigenous community as a whole by breaking stereotypes and thus creating opportunities for generations to come. The Sampson Brothers aim to be successful artists, but also use that success to educate others while keeping their culture alive. With perseverance in modern times and tradition in tact, they bridge two worlds to provide positive inspiration as 21st century warriors.

Hoop dance has been the brothers’ passion and instrument of choice since they first learned as young boys. While the Powwow styles of Grass and Fancy dance were their origins when they began to walk, they were always encouraged to “never stop learning” and try more… that’s when they were introduced to and picked up their first hoops. At first, it was simply to inform and share with their peers at school assemblies, yet it quickly became a means of living, and ultimately, a way of life. More than 25 years later, they have since performed in more than half a dozen countries and at hundreds of universities, and they have educated thousands of individuals around the world about their culture and Indigenous Hoop Dancing.

black and white close-up of male-presenting face with eyebrow piercings, slight goatee and neutral expression
SIOUXPERNATURAL
Troy Eagle Chasing (aka Siouxpernatural) is a musician, producer and artist hailing from the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. Siouxpernatural has made a career producing music and performing nationwide over the course of two decades, and he has received countless nominations and awards from organizations such as the Native American Music Awards and Indian Summer. Currently he works as a DJ and as a personality at KIPI Radio in Eagle Butte, South Dakota.
STARR CHIEF EAGLE
Starr Chief Eagle, a hoop dance extraordinaire, shares the teachings and culture of the Lakota people through language dance and song for all the future generations, all over the world. She involves her audiences with interactional games that involve teaching hoop tricks, quizzing on Lakota language, and other educational exercises that bring the fun into learning. She ends her show by sharing her 21 years of experience hoop dancing, which involves herself dancing with 21 hoops.

Starr Chief Eagle is an enrolled member of the Sicangu (Rosebud) Lakota Sioux Tribe. She was born with the Lakota name Wichahpi Tokahe (First Star) and was later given the Lakota name Wichahpi Ohitika Winyan (Brave Star Woman) as she entered into adulthood. She grew up in the Black Hills of South Dakota including Rapid City and the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation and started hoop dancing before she could walk and since then has been practicing every year to improve her techniques and skills. Starr was raised up in hoop dancing by her father Dallas Chief Eagle and continues to carry on his teachings with a combination of her own.

She has performed the art of Hoop Dancing all throughout the world and continues to further reach out at home and in the heart of the Paha Sapa (Black Hills of South Dakota) at Crazy Horse, Mount Rushmore, and other places such as schools, camps, etc. In her free time, she continues to learn more about the art, history, and language of the Lakota people by pursuing her Bachelor’s degree in Lakota Studies. This knowledge can be seen in her crafts such as beading, sewing, and other artworks as well as influences her performances and teachings, enriching her everyday life.

Redcan NEWS

RedCan 2022 Comes to a Close in the Waniyetu Wowapi Art Park on Saturday, July 9

On Friday and Saturday, July 8-9, the Cheyenne River Youth Project’s 8th annual RedCan invitational graffiti jam entered its final two days. With their five large-scale murals in downtown Eagle Butte now complete, the 11 featured artists moved into CRYP’s Waniyetu...

RedCan 2022 is Under Way in Eagle Butte!

The Cheyenne River Youth Project’s 8th annual RedCan invitational graffiti jam officially kicked off Wednesday, July 6, in Eagle Butte, South Dakota. After the 8:30 a.m. drum song and blessing, the youth project’s 11 guest artists began painting at their five mural...

Our 8th Annual RedCan Schedule is Here: Youth Activities, Cultural Performances, and More

EAGLE BUTTE, SD (July 1, 2022) — The Cheyenne River Youth Project’s 8th annual RedCan invitational graffiti jam begins next week. Starting on Wednesday, July 6, new and transformative public art will rise in the heart of the Cheyenne River Lakota Nation — but that’s...

Announcing the Lineup of Artists & Special Guests for RedCan 2022!

RedCan is rising once again. CRYP's 8th annual invitational graffiti jam is scheduled for Wednesday, July 6 to Saturday, July 9, and CRYP has just released the lineup of its featured artists and special guests for this year’s event. Held in the heart of the Cheyenne...

Cheyenne River Youth Project Launches Public Capital Campaign for Art Center with New Documentary Film

Today, the Cheyenne River Youth Project officially launched the public capital campaign to fund the construction of its new Waniyetu Wowapi (Winter Count) Institute & Art Park. The campaign seeks to raise $1.5 million to complete this eagerly anticipated community...